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Post from November, 2018

Bay Club Members Enjoy Events with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

Tuesday, 27. November 2018 10:58

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Bay Club members recently enjoyed two events with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

In October, members were invited to climb aboard the Institute’s newest research vessel, Neil Armstrong for an exclusive guided tour.  WHOI acquired the ship in April of 2017 and it has been hard at work since then, conducting Oceanographic research, primarily in the Atlantic. Named for the American hero whose “small step” provided humanity with a new perspective on our planet, this vessel carries on its namesake’s legacy of exploration.  In addition to the tour, a scientist spoke to the group about their latest venture, Exploring the Ocean Twilight Zone.  About 30 members made the trip to Falmouth and raved about the tour and experience at the Institute.

Then in early November, an Associate Scientist for WHOI’s Biology department, Dr. Timothy Shank came to the Bay Club to present Who Lives in the Deepest Parts of the Ocean?  During the lecture, he spoke about the hadal zone, which is composed primarily of ocean trenches, represents the deepest marine habitat on Earth (6,000-11,000 meters). All the trenches together occupy an area about the size of Australia. Far from being devoid of life as originally perceived, additional observations have shown that the hadal zone hosts a substantial diversity and abundance of fauna, often endemic to specific locales. Dr. Shank has conducted significant research on the deepest parts of the oceans and on the unusual and unexpected life that they support.

ArmstrongMain_424553Thank you to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute for providing these two fantastic experiences for our membership to enjoy.

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End of the Golf Season… Now What?

Tuesday, 13. November 2018 12:01

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Fall has arrived in New England; Days are getting shorter and sadly, the end of the golfing season is approaching.  So…now what?

Bay Club Golf Professionals suggest putting together a “golf play plan,” to help golfers stay motivated for whatever is next on their calendar.  Depending on what that includes, this plan will differ from person to person.  However, this is a useful exercise for all, no matter your skill level.

When creating a plan, consider the following:

  1. Evaluate the past season
    • Did your handicap or average scores go down/up?
    • What were your go-to shots this year?
    • What shots could use improvement for next season?
  2. Identify your “whys”
    • Why did you start playing golf and why do you continue?
    • “Whys” help motivate us to appreciate the game
  3. Think about your long- and short-term goals
    • What will you do to improve the following:
      • Weaknesses
      • Strengths
      • Mental game
      • Physical well-being

Whether you’re finishing your season here in the cooler temperatures, traveling to play in a warmer climate, or taking time off to rest following a great season, a plan of action will help improve ability as well as enjoyment for the seasons to come.

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Bay Club Members View America’s Longest Painting

Thursday, 1. November 2018 11:57

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Last month, Bay Club members were invited to view the New Bedford Whaling Museum’s exhibition of America’s longest painting, The Grand Panorama of a Whaling Voyage ‘Round the World.  The painting was on display for a short time in the nearby historic Kilburn textile mill.  Painted in 1848 by New Bedford artists, Caleb Purrington and Benjamin Russell, the 1,275-foot painting is longer than the Empire State Building is tall, and depicts a nineteenth century whaling voyage originating from a New Bedford port to the Azores, Cape Verde, Rio de Janeiro and beyond.

It was initially designed as a moving panorama (a form of entertainment during that time, preceding the age of cinema) with multiple scrolls moving across a stage.  Though after many years on display, the wear and tear on the painting was so extensive, it was believed to be impossible to conserve and therefore, worthless.  It was donated to the Whaling Museum in 1918 and following decades of conservation planning and research, the 170-year-old painting was brought back to life and displayed for the public to enjoy (not in its original moving form.)

More than 30 members made the trip to the museum and enjoyed learning about this national treasure and historical depiction of the prominent New Bedford industry.

To view photos of the painting being brought to life in the mill, please click here.

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